Archive for the ‘HarperOne’ Tag

Violence is our God. Hallowed be its name.   2 comments

Violence is our God

We spank children to teach them not to hit one another.  We sanction the killing of killers as a deterrent against killing. We advocate the arming of citizens to promote personal safety. Is it any wonder that people are being deluded into complying with a system that allies them with violence, not compassion; with death, not life?

Even our language is overwhelmed with a continual drumbeat of violence. From seemingly innocuous phrases like, “Shoot me an email” to the “war on poverty” to “He’s da bomb” and even the “Fight for Peace” are simply “to die for” in our culture.

We are a wholly compromised culture that can’t even imagine the existence of any alternatives. Why? Because violence is entertaining, exhilarating, and as Chris Hedges has argued so poignantly, it gives many of us meaning.

Book Cover high resFrom “The Myth of Redemptive Violence” in

Living the Questions:
The Wisdom of Progressive Christianity

by David M. Felten and Jeff Procter-Murphy

Available wherever books are sold or downloaded

It’s a bestseller scheme!   3 comments

12.12.12 graphic

Are you a fan, groupie, or friend of LtQ? Then here’s your chance to help spread the word about Living the Questions and Progressive Christianity! David and Jeff’s new book, “Living the Questions: The Wisdom of Progressive Christianity” is available wherever books are sold or downloaded – BUT, if we all band together and buy a copy on ONE DAY, there’s a good chance that we’ll make it into the “Bestseller” category!

So c’mon – you know you were going to buy a copy anyway. Be sure to go to and buy one (or twelve!) on

December 12th 2012 (that’s 12.12.12!).

 Score the perfect Christmas gift for that hard-to-buy-for friend or relative! Buy a copy for the person you’ve been arguing theology with for years!  Or just buy a copy!


Everyone ordering on ONE DAY is the key!

Thank you in advance for helping David and Jeff out in this hair-brained scheme to conquer the heights of Amazon Bestsellerdom.

–and we’d greatly appreciate your help spreading the word. Many thanks! 

Click HERE or on the graphic above on Wednesday December 12th to order! 

“Living the Questions is an excellent introduction to progressive theology.”

— The Christian Century 

The “Love Wins” Hellabelloo   8 comments

noun [in sing.] informal
1. irrational tantrums among evangelical Christians over Rob Bell’s book, “Love Wins”: that’s quite a hellabelloo over Rob’s new book!
2. a commotion over “the tiddlywinks and peccadilloes of religion” (Fosdick); a fuss

The evangelical blogosphere is all aflutter over Rob Bell’s soon-to-be-unleashed book “Love Wins.”

Having perused an advance copy, we can say that what’s news in evangelical circles is downright passé to most mainline and progressive Christians. For many evangelicals, heaven and hell are at the heart of their so-called “good news,” resting in the comfort that their told-you-so reward is all the more satisfying in the knowledge that countless others are being punished for eternity by an all-loving but sadistic God.

On a practical level, Bell is messing with the evangelical “business model.” Promising a reward in heaven or threatening people with torture in Hell keeps plenty of butts in the seats of countless mega-churches. But more than that, Bell is threatening the very core of evangelical Christianity’s purpose. Denying Hell’s existence leaves evangelicals to wonder, “Why be a Christian?” After all, what’s their understanding of the gospel if it’s not simply glorified fire insurance? Could Jesus’ life and teachings amount to something more than a Get Out of Hell Free card? We progressives like to think so.

In a recent interview for Living the Questions’ new “Saving Jesus Redux,” Diana Butler Bass echoes Bell’s concern that the Church has put too much emphasis on “right beliefs.” Whether the topic be Hell or Jesus, the old understandings have got to go:

“And I think the shift from having faith in Jesus to having beliefs about Jesus was a negative thing for the Church. And to have a person’s orthodoxy, a person’s right relationship with God tested on the nature of what we believe about something is deeply troubling to me. And it’s troubling to me as a Christian; it’s troubling to me as a post-modern person; and I just don’t think it works anymore. I think that we are coming to a different place in our understandings of Jesus and that believing about Jesus is beginning to be replaced by having an experience of Jesus. And I hope that that shift continues. It’s time to leave beliefs about Christianity, in the past.”

Despite the Bell-inspired tantrums (dare we say a hellabelloo?) on display among conservative Christians, there’s nothing they can do about the reality that Christianity is a-changin’ – and it’s not a new phenomenon. Even back in 1922, Harry Emerson Fosdick observed noisy fundamentalists arguing over inane points of “right belief” and asked, “What can you do with folks like this who, in the face of colossal issues, play with the tiddlywinks and peccadilloes of religion?”

So, while blogger John Piper recently tweeted, “Farewell, Rob Bell,” we offer a hearty “Welcome, Rob Bell!” Welcome to a Christianity that has left behind the fear-based, exclusive, and literalistic burdens of right belief in favor of a gospel that is open, inclusive, and grace-filled. It’s a way of following Jesus that you might even say is hell-bent — on naming and mending the injustices and hells that people suffer this side of death.

Welcome, Rob Bell!

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